20 years later: Ginny Green

Published in Art Collector, Issue 80, April-June 2017

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Seriously, if you’re ever feeling jaded about the art world, this woman is your cure. Sydney-based art collector Ginny Green is such a fierce supporter of art and artists. Plus she has a phenomenal eye. The full four-page feature is in the current issue of Art Collector.

Oh and happy birthday to Art Collector! The magazine celebrates its 20th anniversary this issue. Surviving in the art and publishing worlds is a tough gig.

Beyond the border

Published in the Australian Financial Review Magazine, March 2016

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Well, you could probably write a book on the topic of Australian artists and the struggles they’ve faced making it overseas. I almost did.

Luckily, only the six-page version made it out into the world, as part of the Australian Financial Review Magazine’s annual arts issue.

The featured artists Patricia Piccinini, Alex Seton and Christian Thompson are among those who are starting to get more international recognition – here’s to that!

Read full story

Update: Patricia Piccinini’s amazing Brasilian exhibition, which I talk about in this story, made it to #2 in The Art Newspaper’s list of most popular exhibitions in 2016.

Conversations about Chuck Close

Conversation with Terrie Sultan about Chuck Close

It was fascinating to delve into the Chuck Close: Prints, Process and Collaboration exhibition, currently on at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney. I interviewed the artist by email for a piece in Art Guide and also sat down with the delightful US curator Terrie Sultan to have a long chat for Ocula. It was also great to get a sneak peek before the exhibition opened to the crowds – and there will be crowds, it’s a fascinating exhibition.

 

 

Artist interview: Fiona Hall

Published in Art Collector’s special edition for Art Basel Hong Kong 2014

"Fiona Hall" by Jane O'Sullivan in Art Collector

Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery is presenting a series of your tins at Art Basel Hong Kong. When and why did you first start working with the tins? Why have you returned to them now?

I began working with the tins back in 1989 and that first series is now in the National Gallery of Australia. It’s quite a nice metal and I’ve worked with it on and off since then.

The work that Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery is taking to Hong Kong, it’s called Fleet and it’s a set of 12 tins of various varieties of seafood, of slightly different sizes from different companies and so on. The work was made for an environmental project that was funded by an American philanthropic organisation called Pew to try and persuade the New Zealand government not to mine the Kermadec Trench which runs between Auckland and Tonga – it’s the fissure between the Australasian and Pacific tectonic plates … There’s a lot of volcanic activity down there and there are also a lot of sea creatures, many of which are unknown to science as they say … the area’s been assessed as being one of the three most pristine marine environments left on the planet.
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