Kitchen creations

Kitchen creations in Art Guide

This was a fun one! I got to speak to three amazing artists, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Tai Snaith and James Tylor, about the connections between art and cooking in their practices, and what they’ve been cooking during iso. Read the full story and find their recipes over on Art Guide.

Beyond the border

Well, you could probably write a book on the topic of Australian artists and the struggles they’ve faced making it overseas. I almost did.

Luckily, only the six-page version made it out into the world, as part of the Australian Financial Review Magazine’s annual arts issue.

The featured artists Patricia Piccinini, Alex Seton and Christian Thompson are among those who are starting to get more international recognition – here’s to that!

Full story in the Australian Financial Review Magazine, March 2016.

Update: Patricia Piccinini’s amazing Brasilian exhibition, which I talk about in this story, made it to #2 in The Art Newspaper’s list of most popular exhibitions in 2016.

The new realities

Published in Australian Art Collector, Issue 60, April – June 2012

Art HK director Magnus Renfrew believes the art world has changed. It’s a fact, he says, that all kinds of interesting work is now being produced outside of the ma in internat ional art centres of Europe and America. But has Renfrew ma naged to reta in the Hong Kong art fair’s focus on Asia since its change of ownership last year? He talks to Jane O’Sullivan.

There was a curious sense of both regional pride and disdain when the news came through in May last year that the Art HK Hong Kong International Art Fair had been bought by the owners of Art Basel and Art Basel Miami Beach.

On the one hand it was vindication of the fair’s success and the growing importance of Asian collectors in the international contemporary art landscape.

But it also raised eyebrows. Would Art HK become just another Art Basel outpost, showing the same galleries from the same countries? More to the point, did Asian galleries still have a future with the fair? After all, Art Basel and its American counterpart Art Basel Miami Beach are not exactly known for embracing Asian art (or, for that matter, Latin American art, or African art). And even before news of the change of ownership emerged, it was evident the 2011 edition of the fair had attracted ever greater numbers of galleries from Europe and the United States.

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Footloose & fancy free

Published in Australian Art Collector, Issue 58, October – December 2011

For the first time, this year’s annual Primavera exhibition has broken free of the gallery, presenting curator Anna Davis with the chance to showcase young artists working in performance and public art, reports Jane O’Sullivan.

This year Primavera, the Museum of Contemporary Art’s young artist exhibition, is something of a homeless beast. The museum’s own gallery spaces were off limits because of the construction work for the new MCA wing. One option could have been to find a host gallery – as was the case with the MCA’s Tell me tell me exhibition earlier this year, staged at the National Art School – but curator Anna Davis thought there were more interesting avenues to explore.

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Colin Laverty: Beyond sacred

Published in Australian Art Collector, Issue 58, October – December 2011

Collector Colin Laverty has just released a new, expanded version of his book Beyond Sacred. He talks to Jane O’Sullivan about his ongoing mission to change perceptions of Aboriginal art, both at home and overseas, and see it recognised as great contemporary art.

How do you think Aboriginal art is perceived overseas at the moment and, more importantly, how should it be seen?

I’m trying to promote Aboriginal art as great contemporary art. While it’s perceived as tribal or ethnographic art the market for it is tiny. But if you can get it into really great prestigious contemporary museums, both here in Australia and especially overseas, the market for that, and the awareness of it, becomes hugely bigger.

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