Casey Jeffery

Casey Jeffery in Art Collector, Issue 91, Jan-Mar 2020

Casey Jeffery takes the patterns and folds of fabric and flattens them into abstract paintings. They are immediately recognisable as textiles. Interno (Natale), 2018, uses the kind of stylised floral found on vintage curtains. Reveal, 2018, takes the striped ticking used on awnings, but gives it a flip so that it appears more like a Tomma Abts painting. […] “Textiles are a wormhole of possibilities when you use it as the point of reference for a painting,” she says. “I’m interested in utilising the flatness of the painting surface and warping that depth and perception.”

Full story in the print edition of Art Collector, issue 91, January-March 2020.

Jumaadi on love, poetry and doing the work

Jumaadi Q&A in Art Guide

I spoke with Jumaadi about his major exhibition My love is an Island Far Away at Mosman Art Gallery. The title is taken from a poem by Chairil Anwar. As he says:

The poem is celebrating the independence from the Dutch in 1945. It was written about 1946, and then he died a year later, around 27-years old. It captured the restlessness of the time, but in the manner of romantic poetry. I guess that’s how I approach my work, with a grand narrative but very personalised. It’s about love and birth and a way of connecting people.

Full interview in Art Guide Online.

 

Mark Tweedie

Mark Tweedie featured in Vault

“I’m not ever trying to just paint a photograph,” says Mark Tweedie. “The way I paint, I’m being very selective. My paintings are more like a memory…The things that I’m not interested in, or that may not be relevant or have little meaning to me, I make them less saturated, I use washes on those aspects, I keep the paint quite thin. Whereas if there’s something I really want to draw attention to, or it’s something that I remember, then I use colour or thicker impasto paint or a different technique, a more controlled or tighter technique.”

Full interview in the print edition of Vault, Issue 28, November 2019-January 2020.

Jude Rae

Published in Art Collector’s special edition for Art Basel Hong Kong 2014

"Jude Rae" by Jane O'Sullivan in Art Collector

Jensen Gallery is taking your work to Art Basel Hong Kong this year. What will you be presenting?

We are presenting a selection of recent still life paintings which have a more pronounced physical presence than my previous work. The linen I am using lately is more textured than that I have used in the past and the preparation has involved a process that is much more demanding than using pre-primed commercial canvas … This is important because it changes the nature of the paintings, introducing a physicality that establishes the painting more as [an] object both for the viewer and for me as well … I have also found that during the process of painting my awareness moves more in the direction of the how rather than the what of description, a shift I have been working towards for some time.

In both your portraiture and still lifes it seems a very considered choice to avoid the sentimental. You seem very aware of the role you want your art to play within the context of art history and in front of the viewer’s gaze. I’m interested in how you got to this point. When and how did it crystallise for you what you wanted to achieve with your work?

I studied early Italian and northern renaissance art and architecture for my undergraduate degree and continue to read art history and theory fairly widely. I feel it is necessary to understand the history of the discipline and to engage the tradition as a contemporary painter. If I avoid the sentimental it is because it is predictable, some would say kitsch, and I have no interest in the currency of such easy recognition.
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