Lindy Lee

Lindy Lee in Vault magazine

“Repetition, the photograph, the copy—all of those were methods to find a deeper connection,” says Lindy Lee, reflecting on the threads running through her diverse 35-year practice. In that time, she has worked with photocopies, photographs, ink, wax, bronze, paper, steel and fire. She has developed a vivid and symbolic language of colour and then moved towards somethings much more austere. “To me, it’s this continuous journey,” she says. Continue reading “Lindy Lee”

Patrizia Biondi

Patrizia Biondi in Vault magazine

Patrizia Biondi works with discarded cardboard but, as she says, “it’s treated as if it was a precious material”. She labours over every piece—cutting, sanding, gluing and cleaning, often multiple times over. “I treat every little piece of cardboard with dignity.” Continue reading “Patrizia Biondi”

Renee So

Renee So featured in Art Collector, Issue 91, Jan-Feb 2020

Renee So began working with ceramics around the time she moved from Melbourne to London in the mid 2000s. “I was doing lots of research into European trade in the 1700s,” she says. “European trade with China and porcelain were a big catalyst for that and the subsequent ceramics industry in Europe, so I became interested in that material. It had this Chinese identity and provenance…It was sort of the first thing about China was desirable to Europe.”

Full story in issue 91 of Art Collector. Portrait pic by Richard Eaton.

Casey Jeffery

Casey Jeffery in Art Collector, Issue 91, Jan-Mar 2020

Casey Jeffery takes the patterns and folds of fabric and flattens them into abstract paintings. They are immediately recognisable as textiles. Interno (Natale), 2018, uses the kind of stylised floral found on vintage curtains. Reveal, 2018, takes the striped ticking used on awnings, but gives it a flip so that it appears more like a Tomma Abts painting. […] “Textiles are a wormhole of possibilities when you use it as the point of reference for a painting,” she says. “I’m interested in utilising the flatness of the painting surface and warping that depth and perception.”

Full story in the print edition of Art Collector, issue 91, January-March 2020.

Jumaadi on love, poetry and doing the work

Jumaadi Q&A in Art Guide

I spoke with Jumaadi about his major exhibition My love is an Island Far Away at Mosman Art Gallery. The title is taken from a poem by Chairil Anwar. As he says:

The poem is celebrating the independence from the Dutch in 1945. It was written about 1946, and then he died a year later, around 27-years old. It captured the restlessness of the time, but in the manner of romantic poetry. I guess that’s how I approach my work, with a grand narrative but very personalised. It’s about love and birth and a way of connecting people.

Full interview in Art Guide Online.

 

Mark Tweedie

Mark Tweedie featured in Vault

“I’m not ever trying to just paint a photograph,” says Mark Tweedie. “The way I paint, I’m being very selective. My paintings are more like a memory…The things that I’m not interested in, or that may not be relevant or have little meaning to me, I make them less saturated, I use washes on those aspects, I keep the paint quite thin. Whereas if there’s something I really want to draw attention to, or it’s something that I remember, then I use colour or thicker impasto paint or a different technique, a more controlled or tighter technique.”

Full interview in the print edition of Vault, Issue 28, November 2019-January 2020.