Hilma af Klint

Science, geometry, séances: the extraordinary spirit world of once-forgotten artist Hilma af Klint.

Commissioned by a spirit guide, Swedish artist Hilma af Klint spent a decade of her life painting 193 works for a spiralling temple. The temple was never built, and when she died in 1944 she entrusted the works to a nephew, instructing that they not be opened for 20 years. It was a protective act. The world, she thought, was not ready for them.

These temple works were “far ahead of their time,” says Sue Cramer, the curator of The Secret Paintings, which comes to the Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW) in June. “For a long time, her work was dismissed because it was spiritual, and therefore not art.”

It has been a remarkable reappraisal. In 2012, when MoMA staged its canonical exhibition Inventing Abstraction: 1910-1925, her work was not even included.

Full story in Issue 131 of Art Guide.

Gregory Hodge

Gregory Hodge in Sullivan+Strumpf magazinee

“I have a real love of the history of painting but then, in places like the Louvre, there are these little cornices that are beautiful and amazing, and those decorative elements affect the decisions I make in the studio,” says Gregory Hodge about the textures of Paris. Continue reading “Gregory Hodge”