Isadora Vaughan

Out the back of Isadora Vaughan’s studio, there’s a small yard that looks onto a huge, semi-vacant lot. “They’ve been building warehouses out there,” she says. Last year, she watched as they dug enormous basalt boulders out of the ground. “There were these huge rock breakers out the back, turning these giant, giant rocks into smaller boulders.” The rocks got smaller and smaller. “They were making gravel,” she explains. “It was just one of the most amazing and insane processes.”

Vaughan likes working outside. From her spot in the yard of her Melbourne studio she can also see ponds that have been built to filter runoff before it reaches a nearby creek. “All these beautiful, very precise endemic species have been chosen and planted around it. There are reeds – a whole system,” she says. “There are these machines that are doing, on some level, these fantastical things. You can see how much destruction and chaos it’s causing, but then there’s also this industry and this real presence, despite it all, of the native flora and fauna.”

Full story in Issue 35 of Vault magazine.

Sally Anderson

In Sally Anderson’s Sea Belly Screen, the sea is always at a distance. It’s seen from the shore, up high, through a window. It’s always out there, over there—never something you’re in. In these paintings, distance has to be constantly negotiated.

Anderson’s landscape imagery is often taken second-hand, borrowed and filtered through the experiences of others. She takes screenshots of her friends’ social media and references this part of her process in her titles. Heather’s Sea View with GM Vessel and MM Banksias, 2021, is a riff on a view that does not strictly belong to her, and yet it does.

In the en plein air tradition, direct sensory experience is essential to capturing place. Anderson’s works treat landscape as something far less fugitive—far less in need of capturing, and much more powerful. When she paints these fleeting moments, Anderson is acknowledging the split-screen nature of contemporary life, with its layering of simultaneous experience, and also questioning inherited values around immediacy and authenticity.

Full essay over on the Olsen Gallery website.

Lindy Lee

Lindy Lee in Vault magazine

“Repetition, the photograph, the copy—all of those were methods to find a deeper connection,” says Lindy Lee, reflecting on the threads running through her diverse 35-year practice. In that time, she has worked with photocopies, photographs, ink, wax, bronze, paper, steel and fire. She has developed a vivid and symbolic language of colour and then moved towards somethings much more austere. “To me, it’s this continuous journey,” she says. Continue reading “Lindy Lee”

Gregory Hodge

Gregory Hodge in Sullivan+Strumpf magazinee

“I have a real love of the history of painting but then, in places like the Louvre, there are these little cornices that are beautiful and amazing, and those decorative elements affect the decisions I make in the studio,” says Gregory Hodge about the textures of Paris. Continue reading “Gregory Hodge”

Kitchen creations

Kitchen creations in Art Guide

This was a fun one! I got to speak to three amazing artists, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Tai Snaith and James Tylor, about the connections between art and cooking in their practices, and what they’ve been cooking during iso. Read the full story and find their recipes over on Art Guide.

Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu

Nyapanyapa in Art Guide

Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu’s practice defies easy categorisation. The Yolŋu artist is known primarily for her bark paintings but she has also made ghostly fields of larrakitj, drawn on acetate, worked in multimedia, recycled materials and sculpted animals from beach hibiscus. Continue reading “Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu”