Lindy Lee

Lindy Lee in Vault magazine

“Repetition, the photograph, the copy—all of those were methods to find a deeper connection,” says Lindy Lee, reflecting on the threads running through her diverse 35-year practice. In that time, she has worked with photocopies, photographs, ink, wax, bronze, paper, steel and fire. She has developed a vivid and symbolic language of colour and then moved towards somethings much more austere. “To me, it’s this continuous journey,” she says. Continue reading “Lindy Lee”

Gregory Hodge

Gregory Hodge in Sullivan+Strumpf magazinee

“I have a real love of the history of painting but then, in places like the Louvre, there are these little cornices that are beautiful and amazing, and those decorative elements affect the decisions I make in the studio,” says Gregory Hodge about the textures of Paris. Continue reading “Gregory Hodge”

Kitchen creations

Kitchen creations in Art Guide

This was a fun one! I got to speak to three amazing artists, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Tai Snaith and James Tylor, about the connections between art and cooking in their practices, and what they’ve been cooking during iso. Read the full story and find their recipes over on Art Guide.

Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu

Nyapanyapa in Art Guide

Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu’s practice defies easy categorisation. The Yolŋu artist is known primarily for her bark paintings but she has also made ghostly fields of larrakitj, drawn on acetate, worked in multimedia, recycled materials and sculpted animals from beach hibiscus. Continue reading “Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu”

Patrizia Biondi

Patrizia Biondi in Vault magazine

Patrizia Biondi works with discarded cardboard but, as she says, “it’s treated as if it was a precious material”. She labours over every piece—cutting, sanding, gluing and cleaning, often multiple times over. “I treat every little piece of cardboard with dignity.” Continue reading “Patrizia Biondi”

Atong Atem

Atong Atem on the cover of Art Guide

Atong Atem’s commanding works examine the power dynamics embedded in photography, the role of the photographer, and postcolonial and diaspora narratives.

In photographic portraiture, “there will always be some kind of imbalance, even with collaboration,” she says. “I’m interested in how we can challenge the way that power has historically been wielded.”

Full story in the print edition of Art Guide, January-February 2020. Cover artwork is Atong Atem’s Self Portrait in Blue, 2018.