Hilma af Klint

Science, geometry, séances: the extraordinary spirit world of once-forgotten artist Hilma af Klint.

Commissioned by a spirit guide, Swedish artist Hilma af Klint spent a decade of her life painting 193 works for a spiralling temple. The temple was never built, and when she died in 1944 she entrusted the works to a nephew, instructing that they not be opened for 20 years. It was a protective act. The world, she thought, was not ready for them.

These temple works were “far ahead of their time,” says Sue Cramer, the curator of The Secret Paintings, which comes to the Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW) in June. “For a long time, her work was dismissed because it was spiritual, and therefore not art.”

It has been a remarkable reappraisal. In 2012, when MoMA staged its canonical exhibition Inventing Abstraction: 1910-1925, her work was not even included.

Full story in Issue 131 of Art Guide.

Lindy Lee

Lindy Lee in Vault magazine

“Repetition, the photograph, the copy—all of those were methods to find a deeper connection,” says Lindy Lee, reflecting on the threads running through her diverse 35-year practice. In that time, she has worked with photocopies, photographs, ink, wax, bronze, paper, steel and fire. She has developed a vivid and symbolic language of colour and then moved towards somethings much more austere. “To me, it’s this continuous journey,” she says. Continue reading “Lindy Lee”

Gregory Hodge

Gregory Hodge in Sullivan+Strumpf magazinee

“I have a real love of the history of painting but then, in places like the Louvre, there are these little cornices that are beautiful and amazing, and those decorative elements affect the decisions I make in the studio,” says Gregory Hodge about the textures of Paris. Continue reading “Gregory Hodge”

Kitchen creations

Kitchen creations in Art Guide

This was a fun one! I got to speak to three amazing artists, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Tai Snaith and James Tylor, about the connections between art and cooking in their practices, and what they’ve been cooking during iso. Read the full story and find their recipes over on Art Guide.

Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu

Nyapanyapa in Art Guide

Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu’s practice defies easy categorisation. The Yolŋu artist is known primarily for her bark paintings but she has also made ghostly fields of larrakitj, drawn on acetate, worked in multimedia, recycled materials and sculpted animals from beach hibiscus. Continue reading “Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu”

Patrizia Biondi

Patrizia Biondi in Vault magazine

Patrizia Biondi works with discarded cardboard but, as she says, “it’s treated as if it was a precious material”. She labours over every piece—cutting, sanding, gluing and cleaning, often multiple times over. “I treat every little piece of cardboard with dignity.” Continue reading “Patrizia Biondi”