Piinpi

“The timing is right,” says curator Shonae Hobson about the current explosion in contemporary Indigenous fashion. “And the timing is right because this space is really being led by First Nations people.”

Hobson has brought together 70 artists from across Australia for Piinpi at Bendigo Art Gallery. The survey is a testament to the breadth and diversity of this space right now, and includes wearable art and sculpture, runway fashion, streetwear, textile design, jewellery and more. If it’s a broad exhibition, that’s part of the point.

One of the artists is Maree Clarke, who has a three-decade practice across body adornment, photography, lenticular prints, sculpture and major public art commissions. “Still, in 2020, when you say you’re an artist, people say ‘oh, do you do dot paintings?’” she says. “I just roll my eyes.”

Full story in the September/October 2020 issue of Art Guide.

Hi Vis

Hi Vis in Art GuideIn the group exhibition Hi Vis, fashion is used to arrest attention and focus it onto complex political ideas. This show at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre presents a mix of video artworks alongside wearable sculpture, outfits worn by performance artists, and fresh fashion from Western Sydney. Continue reading “Hi Vis”