Tomislav Nikolic

Excerpt of a story published in Art Collector, Jan-Mar 2015

Tomislav Nikolic insists his work doesn’t reproduce well. For him, painting is a three-dimensional object and photography only flattens it. For his last exhibition at Jensen’s Sydney gallery, he applied multiple layers of transparent colour washes to paper. “By applying dozens or even hundreds of coats of paint it builds up a density and a body of colour. When you’re looking at what looks to be one solid colour, you’re actually not looking at the surface, you’re looking through hundreds of layers of paint,” he explains. Only by looking at a work in the flesh can you get the experience of “how that colour and that pigment and that medium behaves,” he says.

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Schwartz takes leap into unknown at Carriageworks

Published in the Australian Financial Review, Weekend Edition, 24 October 2015

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Veteran art dealer Anna Schwartz is handing the keys of her Sydney gallery to Carriageworks and teaming up with Carriageworks director Lisa Havilah to mount an ambitious five-year exhibition program in the space.

Schwartz, who will continue to run her Melbourne gallery, has donated $500,000 to fund the series of exhibitions.

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Export rule changes could revive Indigenous market

Published in the Australian Financial Review, 9 October 2015

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The market for Aboriginal art could be reignited if proposed changes to export restrictions are enacted, according to industry professionals including consultants Tim Klingender and D’lan Davidson.

The Protection of Moveable Cultural Heritage Act controls what culturally important material can leave the country, from Ned Kelly’s armour to art and craft objects. Arts lawyer Shane Simpson AM, who has just handed up his far reaching review of the Act to the government, says the current export system is time consuming and confusing, and has failed to balance the need to protect significant objects with maintaining “legitimate trade”.

Art consultant Tim Klingender says he saw a global market for Aboriginal art developing 20 years ago, but the introduction of the “well-meaning” legislation in 1986 largely quashed the interest of international collectors.

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Sydney Contemporary hits art fair sales record

Published in the Australian Financial Review, 17 September 2015

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Sydney Contemporary closed on Sunday with record sales for an Australian art fair, generating over $14 million across five days. It blitzed fair organiser Tim Etchells’ hopes of a $10 million turnover, and also passed the high point set in 2008, before the global financial downturn shook the local contemporary art market, when the Melbourne Art Fair delivered $12.1 million in sales.