Microflix 2021

Congratulations to animators Jasmine Chia, Shi Yi, Jing He, Sophie Yang and Wendy Xayalith! Their version of my tiny microfiction story Portals has been selected for the 2021 Microflix Festival.

It will be screened online on 26th November, alongside animated versions of stories by Michelle Cahill, Andrew Roff, Jake Dean and Danielle Baldock. I can’t wait to see them all!

Thanks also to Spineless Wonders and the joanne burns Microlit Award for the strange & wonderful opportunity to see my work adapted.

Tickets are free. Register on the Microflix website to receive the zoom link.

Microfiction podcast

What an honour to have my small piece Portals included in a recent Newcastle Writers Festival podcast about prose poetry & microfiction!

This episode features Beth Spencer and Cassandra Atherton chatting about the form and its history here. They also talk about Cassandra’s fabulous Anthology of Australian Prose Poetry. (My copy is dog-eared all the way through! I have so many highlights!)

I really liked what Cassandra and Beth had to say about the white space on the page, and the visual aspect of microlit too.

Listen on the NWF website and Spotify.

Writers Victoria Flash Fiction 2021

If you follow me on Twitter then you’ll know I love a good online flash fiction challenge. They’re always so much fun and I get to know some really interesting writers. The Writers Victoria annual challenge is a bit of an institution (it must take them HOURS to go through all the submissions each day) and I was very pleased to win Day 16 this year, responding to the prompt Burst. You can read the whole month of winners over on the Writers Victoria’s blog.

Piinpi

“The timing is right,” says curator Shonae Hobson about the current explosion in contemporary Indigenous fashion. “And the timing is right because this space is really being led by First Nations people.”

Hobson has brought together 70 artists from across Australia for Piinpi at Bendigo Art Gallery. The survey is a testament to the breadth and diversity of this space right now, and includes wearable art and sculpture, runway fashion, streetwear, textile design, jewellery and more. If it’s a broad exhibition, that’s part of the point.

One of the artists is Maree Clarke, who has a three-decade practice across body adornment, photography, lenticular prints, sculpture and major public art commissions. “Still, in 2020, when you say you’re an artist, people say ‘oh, do you do dot paintings?’” she says. “I just roll my eyes.”

Full story in the September/October 2020 issue of Art Guide.

Rhonda and Susannah Hamlyn

Rhonda and Susannah Hamlyn in Art Monthly

Rhonda Hamlyn’s decade-long collaboration with her mother Susannah (Beatrice) Hamlyn was intense, involving long hours at home together making layered, densely embroidered textiles. They called these works patterned rugs, and later also wall hangings, but the suggestion of soft furnishings was misleading.

They were not entirely abstract or representational, but instead offered slow synaesthetic meditations on language, meaning, sensation and experience.

Their works were not easy to categorise. Rhonda Hamlyn (1944–2015) and Susannah Hamlyn (1916–1994) began their collaboration in the early 1980s, at a time when clear pigeonholes existed for women’s textile work. Their rugs drew on handiwork traditions, shared knowledge and collaborative practice, but did not slot easily into these narratives.

Full story in the Spring 2020 issue of Art Monthly.